Study Tips

How To Be Productive When You Have A Lot Of Work To Do

Blog and Graphic created by: Emily Niedermeyer

As a college student, life can get hectic. Schedules are packed full of classes, clubs, social activities and of course, homework. After a full day, it can be hard to sit down and complete tasks. Conversely, when you have an entirely free day with a long list of assignments to complete, it can also be hard to focus. Here’s some study tips to be productive when you have a lot of work to do.

*Everyone has different study habits and different headspaces in which they feel productive. Some of these tips may work really well for some, and not for others.

1.) Complete Hard Tasks First: Don’t save your hardest assignments for when you’re exhausted and ready to go to bed. When you complete your most intimidating tasks first, you pass the rough patches and guarantee smooth sailing for the rest of your study time. Stressing right before you go to sleep isn’t ideal, so save easier tasks for when you’re ready to go to bed. 

2.) Get Out Of Your Dorm Room: I know your bed is comfy but it’s not ideal for studying! Dorms are surrounded by personal distractions and for many, getting work done is not easy. Finding somewhere to study that encourages a productive environment is a great way to get you in the right headspace to complete a lot of work. 

Similarly, the amount of activity going on around you also influences your productivity. Some might thrive in busy environments; for others, the quiet library might be more ideal. Noise canceling headphones are also a great way to tune out all of those distractions and noises around you; you don’t even have to have music playing. 

3.) No Electronic Devices: One of the most distracting things to any college student nowadays is your cell phone. Whether this means turning your phone off and face down next to you or physically placing it out of reach, detaching yourself from your phone and other electronic devices is important to stay focused.

4.) Make A To Do List: Visualizing everything in front of you in a list can be very helpful when you have a lot of tasks to complete. When you know exactly what you need to do in what order, scheduling like this offers a lot of organization. Plus, the act of checking off a box and scratching a task is so rewarding.

Sectioning off your day hour by hour might also be an option if you prefer a very organized, structured day. Having an agenda or planner that allows you to schedule study times might be ideal. 

5.) Have Incentives: If you complete your work, reward yourself! Whether it be time on your phone before heading to bed, small sweets, social time with friends, or some tv time, incentives are great motivations when studying.

 

The Ultimate Guide to Studying Abroad

The Ultimate Guide to Studying Abroad – SSG Marissa Munoz

So, you’re thinking about studying abroad? Well, here’s a breakdown of what options are available and how to choose one that’s right for you.

Now, let’s get familiar with the programs Northeastern offers. The types of global experiences can be categorized into 4 designations: global co-op, traditional study abroad, Dialogue of Civilizations, and specialized entry programs.

Global Co-Op:

This is exactly what it sounds like! It’s a co-op… but abroad! Picking the best option for you involves discussing details with your co-op advisor, assessing your financial situation, and researching housing options. Some co-ops will provide housing, but not pay. Some pay and leave you to find housing. Some don’t provide either! However, there are countless global co-ops for all majors and fields, so if it is something you’re interested in, it is definitely worth a look!

Traditional Study Abroad:

This is a semester abroad at another university anywhere in the world. Northeastern has agreements with many universities around the globe, but since they are not run directly through Northeastern you will have to double-check on how/if courses transfer. This is a great way to interact with students from other American universities also studying abroad as well as full-time degree-seeking students from the foreign institution.

Dialogue of Civilizations:

These are 4-6 week summer programs that typically offer credit for two classes and take place in one or more countries. There are typically a couple pre-departure orientation meetings, so you get to meet the people that you will spend a majority of your time with for about a month. These run for Summer 1 and Summer 2 and every college have their own programs, but students are encouraged to apply for what they are interested in! The Honors Program runs Honors Dialogues which will fulfill the Interdisciplinary Seminar requirement. This is a great way to learn a lot about a specific topic and work closely with other students who share the same interests.

Specialized Entry:

These programs are for incoming freshmen, so I’ve only included brief summaries.

  • Global Quest: This is a first-year, second-semester program, so students are placed into fall housing together in Boston. While there, they live in a Global Quest LLC and complete pre-departure programming and orientation events throughout the semester. Spring destinations vary by major, and while abroad there are program excursions and activities.
  • N.U.in: This is a first-year, first-semester program (it’s Global Quest’s twin!). This means that students spend their first semester somewhere abroad, then matriculate and come to Boston for their spring semester.
  • Global Scholars: It’s a first-year, full-year program where students study abroad for the entirety of their freshman year! They matriculate as Northeastern students the fall of their second year.

To learn more about specific programs and opportunities, check out the GEO website. Remember, don’t be afraid to step outside your comfort zone & definitely meet with your academic advisor AND the program advisor. Good luck, and bon voyage!

 

Best Study Spots off Campus

As we all know, studying is integral to the college experience. But as much as it is necessary, burnout is very real and can be devastating to our motivation. A helpful way to fight studying fatigue is by switching up your study spot. Here are some alternative study spaces beyond the walls of our dorm or Snell Library.

Boston Public Library

Just down the green line on Copley Square stands Boston Public Library. Sign up for a FREE Boston Public Library card and reserve a study space for the afternoon. Rooms are available for individual or collaborative work, so you have the freedom to stay focused by yourself or study with a friend.

Coffee Shops

Scattered all around campus and the Boston area are hundreds of different coffee shops and cafes. Grab a coffee and study for your next exam in a lively and aromatic environment. Just be sure to check ahead of time if your cafe of choice has WiFi access if you will be logging onto any devices during your stay.

MFA

A huge perk of being a Northeastern student is the access to discounts and freebies around the city. The Museum of Fine Arts is no exception; Northeastern students get free entry into the museum with their student ID. Thursday–Sunday from 10 AM to 4 PM grab your books and visit the Taste cafe located in the Linde Family Wing for Contemporary Art, Level 1.

Reserve a space on campus!

Northeastern has acquired a number of study spaces and desks around the Boston campus that are available for students to reserve. Visit https://spaces.northeastern.edu/ to browse locations, check availability, and reserve a space for yourself or a group to work.

Boston Commons

It might be hard on a beautiful sunny day to stay motivated to study while inside. Instead, bring a blanket and your books to the Boston Commons to enjoy some sunshine while catching up on your class’s readings. All you have to do is hop on the green line to Boylston or Park Street!

Next time you find yourself sitting in the same desk chair or staring at the Snell walls a little too long, try one of these study spots for a change of pace–and maybe a little extra encouragement too.

Finals Studying Tips

By: SSG Emily Niedermeyer

 

After months of lectures, readings and practice work, finals season is now upon us. A whole week is dedicated to preparing for presentations, writing papers and of course, studying for exams. Finals week is arguably the most busy and stressful week of the semester and it can often be very overwhelming for college students. Completing academic work or studying for tests is never the most enjoyable activity, but it can be easier and more efficient with these simple tips. 

  1. Plan Ahead: Lay out a game plan for the week or couple days that you have ahead of you. Knowing your schedule for the next couple of days really helps when planning what you’re going to study and when. It also helps finals week in general seem a lot less intimidating. Instead of spending mental energy stressed about how much you need to complete, plan it out and take it one day at a time. 
  2. Distribute Study Tasks: If you have a final exam in five days, devise a plan to figure out what you are going to study each day, in advance. For example, if there are twelve modules in the course, plan to go through three modules every day and save the last day to go through particularly difficult concepts. If you go into study sessions knowing exactly what you need to complete, there’s a much higher chance of you absorbing more information in a more effective manner. 
  3. Don’t Procrastinate: It can be so easy to keep pushing tasks to the next day, especially with exams and essays that count for over 25% of your final grade. I know that procrastination is so much more appealing sometimes, but preparing early not only makes the whole process less stressful, but you have a better chance of doing better. Eliminate distracting environments (or people) and get to work!
  4. Use Your Resources: First of all, take advantage of office hours and professor assistance. Professors are there to teach and to help you learn. If you don’t understand something or need help figuring out what or how to study, ask! Professors almost always continue to hold their usual office hours during finals week and even expand those hours for students to ask questions. Sometimes, they will even hold a review session. 
    1. Study groups with other students in the class are also extremely helpful. Talking through coursework or figuring out problems can be extremely beneficial because you now have other people to talk it through with. Supportive accountability is also extremely helpful when working with a group. You want to not only help yourself do well, but you want to help others do well too. 
  5. Take Care of Yourself! To reiterate, yes finals week is extremely stressful and often mentally draining. Nothing, however, is more important than your mental and physical health. Know when it’s time to take a break, because sometimes that is more helpful to you than taking the extra hour and draining yourself even more. Take naps, eat lots of snacks and socialize with friends. Finals are important of course, but your well being is more important. 

Places to Visit in Boston

Created By: SSG Nishita Mistry

Welcome Week Events

Sunday, September 4th  from 2 – 4 pm

SSI: Pack Picnic

Location: Centennial Common

Description: The Student Support Initiative is hosting our first ever Pack Picnic for our incoming first year and transfer students. We encourage learners to join their packs and / or their SSG to enjoy refreshments, games, and more. We hope to see you there to snap a pic, meet your pack or grab a snack! This event is open to first-year undergraduate students and new transfer students only. Registration is encouraged: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ssi-pack-picnic-tickets-400378682417 

Thursday, September 8th from 11 am – 2 pm

Take What You Need

Location: Library Quad

Description: Forgot to buy laundry detergent while moving in? Need some shower shoes for the bathroom? SSI has you covered! We invite all learners on the MentorHub NU app to drop by with their packs and take what they need!  

Friday, September 9th from 12:00 – 4 pm

The Scoop on SSI

Location: Stearns Center (SSI Office – Stearns Center Second Floor)

Description: Have questions about SSI? Join us to get the scoop on our office! We highly encourage all learners all the MentorHub NU app to stop by with their packs and/or SSG to grab some ice cream, meet some Success Coordinators, and chill after the first week of class. 

Connect Now!

All Incoming Fall 2022 Students

On behalf of the Student Support Initiative (SSI), we want to welcome you to Northeastern! Our team is here to support you before, and during your first year here at Northeastern. Our team of Student Success Guides (SSGs) will serve as a mentor and resource whenever you have a question, concern, need some advice, or want to just grab some coffee together. They cannot wait to connect with you – and are looking forward to meeting you! 

You are now able to connect with your SSG through downloading and using MentorHub NU today, available on the App or Play Store. You will use your Northeastern credentials to login, and if you have yet to claim your credentials you can learn more here.

Our team cannot wait to connect with you!

Summer Support on the Spot

Need an SOS? Join the Student Support Initiative for our summer Support on the Spot (SOS) Series! Over the course of several weeks, Success Coordinators and Student Success Guides will be hosting conversations on different topics as you prepare for your journey as a Northeastern student. Come to ask questions, make connections, or just listen – we are excited to meet you! 

Missed a session? Request any currently available recordings of past sessions here!

June 22 from 3 – 4 pm

SOS: Welcome to Northeastern – Connecting on Campus

Join the Student Support Initiative for our summer Support on the Spot (SOS) Series! In this first session, we are welcoming you to Northeastern and talking all about how to connect on campus. You will have the opportunity to ask current Northeastern students and staff questions and hear their perspective.

Registration link

June 29th from 6 – 7 pm

SOS: Academic Habits and Planning  

In this session, we are discussing academic habits and planning. You will have the opportunity to ask current Northeastern students and staff questions and hear their perspective.

Registration link

July 13th from 3 – 4 pm

SOS: Finances

In this session, we are discussing finances and on-campus employment. You will have the opportunity to ask current Northeastern students and staff questions and hear their perspective.

Registration link

July 21st from 12 – 1:30 pm

SOS: NUBound NCH Pre-Departure Information

Join the staff in London to learn more about what your journey as a NUBound student will be whilst you spend a year in London at New College of the Humanities. You will get to meet the team, learn about NCH and London as a local area, hear more about the academic program, and get an overall idea of the culture and life of a NUBound student. We can’t wait to meet you. This is a special session for NUBound students headed to London this fall.

Registration link

July 27th from 6 – 7 pm

SOS: Career

In this session, we will discuss career resources on campus and the student co-op experience. You will have the opportunity to ask current Northeastern students and staff questions and hear their perspective.

Registration link

August 10th from 3 – 4 pm

SOS: Health and Wellbeing

In this session, we will discuss health and well-being resources and how to find time for self-care as a student. You will have the opportunity to ask current Northeastern students and staff questions and hear their perspective.

Registration link

August 24th from 6- 7 pm

SOS: Welcome to Boston

In this final session, we will discuss all things Boston and preparing to move to campus. You will have the opportunity to ask current Northeastern students and staff questions and hear their perspective.

Registration link

 

Incoming Fall 2022 Students

Welcome future Huskies!

On behalf of the Student Support Initiative (SSI), we want to welcome you to Northeastern! Our team is here to support you before, and during your first year here at Northeastern. Our team of Student Success Guides (SSGs) will serve as a mentor and resource whenever you have a question, concern, need some advice, or want to just grab some coffee together. They cannot wait to connect with you! 

You will be able to connect with your SSG through downloading and using MentorHub NU starting in early June. You will receive communications via email from the university in the coming weeks with more details. Our team cannot wait to meet you!

 

The Value of a Check-In

Check-in to MentorHub, your SSG is there and ready to help!